Sustainable design has often been associated with a craft-based approach to building, yet while rammed-earth and timber-frame construction remain popular and straw-bale walls are fast becoming commonplace, much of sustainable design today has its roots in the science of high-tech materials.

{fof, align=left} Sustainable design has often been associated with a craft-based approach to building, yet while rammed-earth and timber-frame construction remain popular and straw-bale walls are fast becoming commonplace, much of sustainable design today has its roots in the science of high-tech materials.

Newly emerging nanomaterials enable designers to exert an unprecedented degree of control over the physical properties of surfaces and structures. This allows programmatic functions of a building to be met while consuming fewer natural resources and less energy.

Greenway Communications has released a new Focus on the Future report that examines this leading-edge subject. Author Stephen D. LeSourd examines how nanaotechnology is being used increasingly to protect the natural environment, offering readers a wealth of examples of both products and real-world applications.

The report can be found in the DI.net bookstore.