There are any number of ways to communicate, but according to a recent Cornell University study, we’re most likely to lie over the phone.

There are any number of ways to communicate, but according to a recent Cornell University study, we’re most likely to lie over the phone.

The study admittedly was aimed at a specific sliver population: 30 students were asked to keep a communications diary for a week. In this instance, it appears the more transitory (and removed) the means of communication, the more likely we are to be truthful. The breakdown:

  • In 37 percent of phone calls, they lied or “fibbed.”

  • 27 percent of face-to-face conversations

  • 21 percent of instant messages

  • And only 14 percent of E-mail, according to the students, contained falsehoods.

Researchers found that many lies were spontaneous responses to unexpected questions, such as “Do you like my dress?” Hmmm.