I’ve come to understand that even the most confident leaders are often tormented with questions regarding their own achievement and self-worth. The external appearance may say one thing, while the internal feelings are quite another.

There cannot be anybody in this industry that is not plagued with periods of self-doubt. I’ve come to understand that even the most confident leaders are often tormented with questions regarding their own achievement and self-worth. The external appearance may say one thing, while the internal feelings are quite another.

Let’s take your own situation. The demands on your time are often so extreme that it is important to exercise a degree of introspection about your role in your organization. This involves an honest self-examination about one’s own motives and some intellectual exercise to challenge your own talent and behavior patterns as a player in your firm.

Now let’s venture into an exercise and look at one short case study that will likely be relevant to you. Through the management audit, it was learned that the staff of a firm believed that the CEO was motivated primarily by power. The analysis also found that the number one concern of the employees was poor communication. In fact, there was questionable career satisfaction at all levels. Even the CEO was frustrated and lacked a clear resolve about his future in the firm. There was marginal profitability and loose project management. Staff were asked to work long hours and were becoming more resentful. The CEO said that the more control and power that he tried to exercise, the less effective he seemed to be. And all agreed that there was a serious disconnect between leader and staff.

The CEO lacked the power to lead. The organization was dysfunctional because it did not communicate, and the people in the firm were lacking career satisfaction all around. Clients were not getting the quality that they expected to get.

Happily, most firms are in better shape. Still, no firm is perfect. No matter what level you find yourself in the the firm, it’s always smart to develop your own mental and physical toughness for the future. Ask yourself this question: Am I in the right job?

Now, make a list of your values. Include such areas as family, compensation, having fun, work environment, mentoring and learning, and enthusiasm about your daily work life. Also ask this question: Am I working in the best organization for me?

How do you know? Consider these findings: 1. Often we find that people who seek power are not, in fact, the best leaders. 2. Strong communications are at the core of every successful firm. 3. If you want to find a healthy firm–take a close look at the pulse of their project management performance. 4. If you find a firm that has a passion for client services, you will likely find competence.

Anyone who regularly reads DI knows that I have two areas of personal passion: 1. people and their performance and 2. change and the future of the industry. There is now tremendous opportunity all over in this industry. While your situation is unique to you, I recommend that you pause to take stock of your career satisfaction. As you assess the environment that you are in, remember that you have options. There are times to change jobs, roles and work environments. This may be the right time for someone you know.