Nearly 180,000 people are added to the urban population everyday. And, as demographics research indicates, population centers for entire countries are now classified as urban, possessing no rural inhabitants.

Nearly 180,000 people are added to the urban population everyday. And, as demographics research indicates, population centers for entire countries are now classified as urban, possessing no rural inhabitants.

Tracking population distributions and projected annual changes in population concentrations can indicate the emergence of potential design opportunities as well as indications of emerging social conflict. Shifts in urban development and the increasing influx of rural populations to urban centers are resulting in myriad design opportunities, and as many dilemmas. Targeting existing and emerging urban population centers, places leading design firms in uniquely influential positions as municipalities work to address emerging and existing issue associated with population density.

Equally as important is the focus on growing communities and development in what have historically been perceived as fringe communities; exurbs, suburbs, bedroom, and rural communities are in a rapid state of flux as energy costs force communities to reconsider priorities and development strategies. Rural areas now warrant as much consideration as urban, when the interconnectedness of agriculture and urban proliferation is taken into equal account.

Urban populations require increased development of a huge array of infrastructure and infill alternatives as space for commerce, transit, and human habitation becomes increasingly more valuable. Innovative firms address these issues well in advance and establish intellectual primacy over the needs of communities as high-concentration urban centers continue to increase and lower-concentration rural regions continue to change to meet shifting demands for raw materials and food.