The leading design firms in the U.S. already have LEEDS professionals on staff, and the numbers are growing rapidly. Counsel House Research shows that new members are obtaining certification daily.

The leading design firms in the U.S. already have LEEDS professionals on staff, and the numbers are growing rapidly. Counsel House Research shows that new members are obtaining certification daily. The graphs below represent membership as of late August. Still, certification lags in some parts of the country. States with five or fewer LEEDS member include Alabama, (1); Arkansas, (4); Delaware, (2); Indiana, (2); Iowa, (1); Kentucky, (3); Louisiana, (1); Maine, (2); Mississippi, (1); and West Virginia (1). Another indicator in the spread of green consideration in the field: in two years, membership in the AIA Committee on the Environment has more than quadrupled.

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LEEDS Certification Spreads to Commercial, Existing Buildings

Commercial and residential buildings use about two thirds of the nation’s electricity, and by 2010, 38 million buildings will be added to the 76 million that now exist, according to the EPA. Below are USGBC estimates on the impact of commercial and residential buildings in this country.

  • 65.2 percent of total US electricity consumption

  • 36 percent of US primary energy use

  • 30 percent of total US greenhouse gas emissions

  • 136 million tons of construction and demolition waste in the US (approximately 2.8 lbs per person day)

  • 12 percent of potable water in the US

  • 40 percent (3 billion tons annually) of raw materials use globally