Eight of the world’s most expensive cities, according to a survey released in June by U.K. human resources firm, Mercer, are in Asia, which is a consideration if your firm is bidding on projects or hiring abroad.

Eight of the world’s most expensive cities, according to a survey released in June by U.K. human resources firm, Mercer, are in Asia, which is a consideration if your firm is bidding on projects or hiring abroad.

Tokyo and Hong Kong are at one and two; New York, the most expensive city in the Americas, is no. 13; and London is Europe’s most costly city, ranked at no. 3.

The survey covers 144 cities in six continents, measuring the comparative cost of more than 200 factors, including food, transportation, and housing. Tokyo scored a 134.7, London is at 120.3, and New York scored 100. Moscow is Europe’s second-most expensive city at no. 4 with a score of 119, followed by Geneva (no. 6, score 113.5), Zurich (no. 7, score 112.1), and Copenhagen (no. 8, score 110). Other costly U.S. cities include Los Angeles (no. 44, score 86.7), San Francisco (no. 50, score 84.9), Chicago (no. 52, score 84.6), and Washington D.C. (no. 78, score 77.4).

When you take a look at the fastest-growing cities in the U.S. with a population of at least 100,000, they are not as well known as the most expensive U.S. cities. According to U.S. Census Bureau figures, Gilbert, Ariz., with a growth rate of 32 percent between April 2000 and July 2003, tops the list, and North Las Vegas, Nev.; Henderson, Nev.; Chandler, Ariz.; and Irvine, Calif.; round out the top five.